Who is the smartest cricketer

Hoppe

At your own risk!

Even the title of the book arouses curiosity. Just imagine "Walser" as the title of a novel by Martin Walser, every book lover rubs his eyes in astonishment. So originality already on the cover - and the story? Also original, that much has to be said in advance. In any case, it shouldn't be irritating for the reader that the author writes about a certain Felicitas Hoppe in her novel, which could also be described as a fictional autobiography. Even if Denis Scheck “flicks a flap with joy” with this novel, which the pose in the cover photo may have encouraged him to do, the feature section turns out to be quite divided, between jubilation and disapproval, and no different from the reader's critics. That makes you curious ... more

At your own risk!

Even the title of the book arouses curiosity. Just imagine "Walser" as the title of a novel by Martin Walser, every book lover rubs his eyes in astonishment. So originality already on the cover - and the story? Also original, that much has to be said in advance. In any case, it shouldn't be irritating for the reader that the author writes about a certain Felicitas Hoppe in her novel, which could also be described as a fictional autobiography. Even if Denis Scheck “flicks a flap with joy” with this novel, which the pose in the cover photo may have encouraged him to do, the feature section turns out to be quite divided, between jubilation and disapproval, and no different from the reader's critics. That makes you curious, at least me!

This unconventional novel of postmodernism, which violates almost all conventions, is a grandiose parody of the literary genre of autobiography, the principle of which is completely turned upside down here. Actually, this Eulenspiegelei is nothing more than an amusing search for the protagonist's identity. The jury of the Büchner Prize remarked appropriately: "At a time when speaking on one's own behalf is increasingly dominating literature, Felicitas Hoppe's sensitive and, despite all sense of humor, melancholy storytelling revolves around the secret of identity." She lies as if in print in this rogue piece, which is reminiscent of Don Quixote in many ways, a cheeky performance ride by this extremely creative author through her imagined life story. "Her imagination mercilessly texted everything" she writes about Hoppe, who is "in love with her own doubts", but also remarks ironically: "Crown yourself, otherwise nobody will crown you".

In a virtuoso game with identities the reader experiences this literary wonder world beyond reality, follows Hoppe as a gifted hockey player, musician, inventor, composer and writer from Hameln to Canada, Australia and even to Las Vegas, in “the most beautiful and splendid city of World". He meets Glenn Gould, Franz Kafka, Pippi Longstocking, Pinocchio, and the Wizard of Oz, and learns of Hoppe's ingenious inventions such as the “glowing puck” for hockey players or the “sheet turner”, with which an ancient human problem can be solved very easily leaves. All of this is told in an amazing mix of own narration, diary entries, interviews and conversation notes, supplemented by frequent comments (by the author) and fictional quotes from critical reviewers, which she elegantly takes the wind out of the sails. Which promptly seems to have annoyed some of the real reviewers, as you can read everywhere, because you can also score an own goal in literary terms.

Authenticity, that much should be clear, is not a topic in Hoppe's intelligent and amusing novel full of original linguistic finesse; she ironically fantasized a turbulent life story that literally sweeps the reader away, provided that he does not belong to the genre of criticism who write in red ink . The receptive and language-sensitive reader, on the other hand, can look forward to a few inspiring hours with "Hoppe", which some even spontaneously crown with a real flick-flick (at your own risk, please / bo).