Is the Bhagavad Gita real

Bhagavad-Gita, Chapter 2, 1-53: Arguments and Yoga

CONTENT: Arjuna asks Krishna for instruction - The human body is like a garment of the embodied - The real thing is indestructible - One's own life's task is to be observed - (from verse 54) The one established in wisdom

­

Om, the auspicious supreme self bowing.
The second chapter begins here.


­

Sanjaya spoke -

­

To the compassionate, desperate one, whose eyes were confused and full of tears, Krishna then said this word: (2: 1)


­­­­ ­­­

The glorious spoke -

­

Where did this despondency in danger approach you? The noble one does not like that, does not lead to heaven, brings shame, Arjuna! (2: 2)


­­­­ ­­­­

Don't go to the unmanliness, Arjuna, that doesn't suit you. Renounce this petty weakness of heart and arise, you chastener! (2: 3)


­­­­ ­­­

Arjuna spoke -

­

How should I fight the Bhīshma and the Drona with arrows in battle? Both are worthy of worship, Krishna. (2: 4)


­­­­ ­­­­

It is better not to kill the gurus, the noble ones, even as the beggars are carried on in this world. Once I have killed the gurus who seek their advantage, I can only enjoy blood-smeared joys on earth. (2: 5)


­­­­ ­­­­

And we don't know which of the two is better for us: that we will win or that they will defeat us. When we have killed these Dhritarāshtra sons lined up in front of us, we do not want to live either. (2: 6)


­­­­ ­­­­

My being is overwhelmed by misery and guilt, my mind confused about the Dharma, I ask you what would be better, tell me firmly. I am your student. Teach me who have taken refuge in you. (2: 7)


­­­­ ­­­­

I do not see what could drive away my burning pain that consumes my senses, even if I had achieved a prosperous kingdom on earth without rivals or even if I had achieved supremacy over the gods. (2: 8)


­­­­ ­­­

Sanjaya spoke -

­

After Arjuna had spoken to Krishna like this, O King, he said to him, “I do not fight,” and was silent. (2: 9)

("O King", Sanjaya uses it to address Dhritarâshtra, to whom he reports all this.)


­­ ­­­­

To him, the desperate one, Krishna spoke this word, laughing as it were, O King, in the midst of both armies: (2:10)


­­­­ ­­­

The glorious spoke -

­

You have mourned the unrepentant and speak words of wisdom in the process. The knowledgeable mourn neither the dead nor the living. (2:11)


­­­­ ­­­­

There is no time when I did not exist, nor you, nor these princes, and in the future neither will we all cease to be. (2:12)


­­­­ ­­­­

Just as there is childhood, youth, old age in this body for the person having the body, there is also the attainment of another body. The established one is not confused about this. (2:13)


­­­­ ­­­­

The touches with material elements, Arjuna, give cold, heat, pleasant and unpleasant, they come and go and are impermanent. Endure them with inner strength, Arjuna. (2:14)


­­­­ ­­­­

The person, Arjuna, whom you do not upset, who is equally unpleasant and pleasant towards you, inwardly strengthened, is ready for the [experience of] immortality. (2:15)


­­­­ ­­­­

There is no being of the unreal, there is no non-being of the real. The essence of these two is seen by the truth seers. (2:16)


­­­­ ­­­­

As indestructible, know what all of this has spread. Nobody can cause the destruction of this indestructible. (2:17)


­­­­ ­­­­

It is said that these bodies of the eternal body, of the indestructible and immeasurable, have an end. So fight, Arjuna. (2:18)


­­­­ ­­­­

Whoever sees him as killing, and who believes him killed, both have no deep understanding. This neither kills nor is he killed. (2:19)


­­­­ ­­­­

He is not born, nor does he ever die. It is not [something that] has arisen and ceases to be. Unborn, eternal, uninterrupted, ancient, he is not killed when the body is killed. (2:20)


­­­­ ­­­­

Who knows this indestructible, eternal, unborn, immortal, Arjuna, how could this person have someone killed or kill someone? (2:21)


­­­­ ­­­­

Just as a person sheds worn clothes and grabs other, new ones, so the one who has a body sheds worn bodies and goes into other new ones. (2:22)


­­­­ ­­­­

Weapons do not cut it, fire does not burn it, water does not wet it, wind does not dry it out. (2:23)


­­­­ ­­­­

It is indivisible, incombustible, non-wettable, non-desiccable, eternal, omnipresent, solid, immobile, primeval. (2:24)


­­­­ ­­­­

It is not revealed, cannot be grasped by thought, cannot be changed, it is said. If you understand him that way, you needn't mourn him. (2:25)


­­­­ ­­­­

However, if you regard him as constantly being born and constantly dying, then even Arjuna you need not suffer pain for him. (2:26)


­­­­ ­­­­

There is a certain death for the born, and there is a certain birth for the dead. Therefore, there is no need to complain about this inevitable issue. (2:27)


­­­­ ­­­­

What has become unmanifested at the beginning, manifested in the middle of their existence, and unmanifested at the end. For which lawsuit is this an occasion? (2:28)


­­­­ ­­­­

Someone looks at him in astonishment, someone else speaks of it in amazement, someone else hears about him in amazement, but no one who has only heard from him understands him. (2:29)


­­­­ ­­­­

This having body in the body of all is forever inviolable, Arjuna. That's why you don't need to complain about anything that has become. (2:30)


­­­­ ­­­­

And you do not need to despair with regard to your own life's work, because there is nothing better than a just fight for the warrior. (2:31)


­­­­ ­­­­

Unexpectedly, there was an open gate to heaven. Happy are the warriors, Arjuna, who achieve such a battle. (2:32)


­­­­ ­­­­

But if you do not go into this righteous struggle, then you have discarded your purpose in life and your fame and will attain disaster. (2:33)


­­­­ ­­­­

The beings will report shame about you, imperishable ones! For the respected, shame is greater than death. (2:34)


­­­­ ­­­­

The great charioteers will think that you stepped back from battle out of fear. With those you were respected for, you will go to insignificance. (2:35)


­­­­ ­­­­

Your enemies will speak many words that shouldn't be said and will make fun of your strength. What's more painful than that? (2:36)


­­­­ ­­­­

Either you will reach heaven as slain or you will enjoy earth as victor. Therefore, Arjuna, arise determined to fight. (2:37)


­­­­ ­­­­

After you have made the pleasant and the unpleasant, win and loss, win and loss synonymous, focus on the fight. So you will not get guilt. (2:38)


­­­­ ­­­­

This is the insight that was explained to you in the weighing of the pros and cons [by me]. But hear them from the yoga experience. Linked to the insight of yoga, Arjuna, you will lose the chains of karma. (2:39)


­­­­ ­­­­

No effort is useless here, there is no adverse effect. Even a little of this way protects against great danger. (2:40)


­­­­ ­­­­

The insight here is resolute and united, Arjuna. But the insights of the undecided are manifold and endless. (2:41)


­­­­ ­­­­

That flowery speech proclaimed by those without inspired consciousness, delighting in Veda words and claiming that nothing else is true ... (2:42)


­­­­ ­­­­

- which concerns the rebirth resulting from the fruits of action, a multitude of special rites and the path to enjoyment and power. The heralds are desire-driven with heaven as their goal. (2:43)


­­­­ ­­­­

Those who cling to pleasure and power are robbed of their clear consciousness by this speech. You are not given a determined insight into meditative unification. (2:44)


­­­­ ­­­­

The area to which the Vedas refer is characterized by the three Gunas. Be free from the three Gunas, Arjuna, free from the pairs of opposites, firmly established in eternal being, without worrying about maintaining your prosperity, resting in yourself. (2:45)


­­­­ ­­­­

As much use as a well has where water flows together from all sides, so much use is in all Vedas for the knowing scholar of God. (2:46)


­­­­ ­­­­

Your privilege is in doing, never in results. Do not let the fruit of doing be your motivation, nor indulge in inaction. (2:47)


­­­­ ­­­­

Established in yoga, after releasing attachment, do deeds, Arjuna, and abide the same in success and failure. Equanimity is called yoga. (2:48)


­­­­ ­­­­

Doing is way below applying discernment, Arjuna. Take refuge in discernment. Those motivated by results are pathetic. (2:49)


­­­­ ­­­­

In this world, those who are connected with insight discard both: well done and badly done. Therefore practice yoga: Yoga is a blessing skill in action. (2:50)


­­­­ ­­­­

After the sages associated with insight have let go of the results of doing, they are freed from the compulsion to be born again and come to the state without illness. (2:51)


­­­­ ­­­­

When your insight has overcome the thicket of confusion, you will arrive at indifference to what is still to be heard and what has already been heard. (2:52)


­­­­ ­­­­

When your insecure insight, unsettled by what you have heard, is steadfastly consolidated, unsteady in meditative unification, then you will attain yoga. (2:53)


­­­­ ­­­­

If you think you know well, then verily you now know little of the nature of Brahman. What of it you are, what of it is among the gods, so now it should be checked by you who think you know. (2: 1)


­­­­ ­­­­

I don't think I know it well: neither do I know it, nor do I know it. Those of us who understand this know: I neither do not know it, nor do I know it. (2: 2)


­­­­ ­­­­

For whom there is nothing thought about it, he has thought correctly, for whom there is something thought about it, he does not know. It is something unrecognized for those who understand deeply. Something recognized for those who do not understand deeply. (2: 3)


­­­­ ­­­­

He who has understood through the knowledge of awakening finds immortality, through himself he finds strength, through knowledge he finds bliss. (2: 4)


­­­­ ­­­­

If you can see it in this world, then it's real. If you do not see it in this world it is a great loss. After perceiving it in this and that being, the wise become immortal when they have left this world. (2: 5)


­­­

This was the second section in the Kena Upanishad

only translation: 1 21-53 254-72 3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18 
with Sanskrit analysis: Gîtâdhyânam 1 21-53 254-72 3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18