How much is Jeremy Corbyn worth

It was news that few Britons paid any attention to on June 4, 2015. "Labor MP Jeremy Corbyn is running for the party chairmanship with an anti-austerity program," was the headline Guardian his message and briefly informed about Corbyn's résumé. In parliament since 1983, far left in the parliamentary group and supporter of nuclear disarmament.

In 2015 no one suspected that Corbyn would succeed in becoming head of Labor - and that exactly two years and four days later, this proud party would be the top candidate in an election. When Theresa May proclaimed this in mid-April, the conservative prime minister was hoping for a solid majority - her advisors expected that the 68-year-old Labor leader would continue to tear the Social Democrats into the abyss. Corbyn is "unelectable", that's what all experts have been saying for years.

But this certainty wobbles. "Corbyn made this election a real competition," she says with astonishment Financial Timeswho naturally sees the old left skeptically. And also the weekly magazine Economist, which Corbyn likes to call "loony lefty", admits: The "left weirdo" waged a tactically clever election campaign and managed to change the debate. Instead of Brexit and leadership, schools and hospitals were discussed. Then there were the attacks in Manchester and London - and May's lead became smaller and smaller. Labor is unlikely to fare worse than under Ed Miliband in 2015 under Corbyn; Experts expect a majority for the Tories in the British Parliament.

His amazing success is based on the mixture that made him party leader: Corbyn condemns the Tories' austerity policies and calls for a change of course. He is campaigning for more investment in education (no tuition fees) and in the NHS health system, he wants to nationalize the post office and the railways and a minimum wage of ten pounds. All of this fits in with the slogan "For the many, not the few". Labor wants to finance these benefits exclusively through higher taxes for wealthy citizens and businesses.

Why many young people admire Jeremy Corbyn

The senior Corbyn receives the greatest support from the young British. Tens of thousands joined the party to elect him to office (and to be confirmed in the fall of 2016 after Brexit) - and they are now flocking to Corbyn's events en masse. Anyone who talks to students hears a lot of praise for the Labor candidate. "He's a man of conviction," says Orla Menzies, who studies at the University of Edinburgh. He seems honest and sincere. All of her friends nod when the 20-year-old complains that the UK media has too much influence: "You're knocking down Corbyn on a tour, that's disgusting."

This impression can hardly be contradicted: The Daily Telegraph calls Corbyn and his shadow Treasury Secretary John McDonnell the "Marx Brothers" while the Daily Mail the day before the election Corbyn demonized on 13 pages and the tabloid Sun von Rupert Murdoch warns of a "secret garden tax" that the Labor man is planning.

Similar to the "democratic socialist" Bernie Sanders, who shook up the US pre-election campaign in 2016, Corbyn's supporters are increasingly relying on social media to advertise their hero - and anyone who criticizes him is harshly criticized there. With "People's Momentum" there is a grassroots movement of its own that aims to mobilize young people first and then get them to vote - both online and offline. Corbyn himself promotes a tolerant and cosmopolitan Great Britain that does not exclude immigrants - and often not a single word is necessary, as this video shows:

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His fans like that Corbyn has remained true to his principles (he vehemently opposed the Iraq war) and enthusiastically watch a video on Youtube from 1990 in which Corbyn reproaches Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in parliament for the poverty in the country "a shame". Like Sanders, Corbyn speaks of a movement he is at the head of, and short videos are posted on Twitter every minute in which the Labor man criticizes the aloof elites for their cynicism.

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Recently, Corbyn's popularity has increased enormously, from a value of 42 minus points to just minus two. That doesn't mean that reservations have decreased, but in the TV debates and interviews in particular, the Labor man with the gray beard appeared polite, relaxed and fairly confident.

The harsh attacks by Prime Minister Theresa May, according to which Corbyn would go "alone and naked in the negotiating room" with the EU in matters of Brexit, are no longer right: the opposition leader does not seem irascible or unable to familiarize himself with complex issues (see his foreign policy - Speech after the attack in Manchester). And her refusal to face a TV debate has damaged May's image of the strong leader.