Can the billing be canceled?

Revoking and repeating entries

You can undo and redo up to 20 of your most recent input or design actions in Access. To undo an action, press CTRL + Z. To redo an undone action, press Ctrl + Y.

The Undo and Redo features allow you to remove or redo single or multiple input actions, but all actions must be undone or undone in the order in which you undone or undone them - you cannot skip any actions. For example, if you change the value of three fields in a record and then decide that you want to undo the first change you made, you must undo all three changes.

Likewise, you can undo most of the design changes you make to database objects, such as: For example, adding a control to a report or adding a sort order to a query field. Design changes must also be reversed in the order.

Content of this article

Undo the data entry

  • To undo the last data entry, press CTRL + Z.

  • To undo multiple actions, do the following:

    • On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the arrow next to Undo , and then select the actions you want to undo.

      All selected input actions are canceled. However, the actions you can undo start with the last action, and you can only undo the actions in the order in which they occurred. For example, you can not only undo the changes you have made on the second entry. To undo the second input change, you'll also need to undo the action that was before.

    • If you can't reach the Quick Access Toolbar (for example, because you're using a modal form), press Ctrl + Z repeatedly until you undo the action you want to undo.

Important: Some actions are irreversible, such as: B. by clicking on a command the File tab. If an action cannot be undone, the Undo Enter command changes to Can't undo.

Top of page

Undo design changes

You can undo design changes to database objects in the same way as data entry.

  • To undo the last design change, press Ctrl + Z.

  • To undo multiple actions, do the following:

    • Press Ctrl + Z repeatedly until the action you want to undo is undone.

    • On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the arrow next to Undo , and then select the actions you want to undo.

      All selected input actions are canceled. However, the actions you can undo start with the last action, and you can only undo the actions in the order in which they occurred. For example, you can not only undo the changes you have made on the second entry. To undo the second input change, you'll also need to undo the action that was before.

Important: Some actions are irreversible, such as: B. by clicking on a command the File tab. If an action cannot be undone, it changes the command Undo in Can't undone.

Top of page

Redoing undone actions

  • To redo the last undone action, press Ctrl + Y.

  • Proceed as follows to repeat several actions as follows:

    • Press Ctrl + Y repeatedly until the actions are repeated again.

    • On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the arrow next to Repeat , and then click the actions that you want to repeat.

      The actions are re-illuminated in the order in which they are listed. You can only repeat the actions in the order in which they occurred. You can e.g. For example, don't just repeat the second action you undone. To repeat the second action as follows, you must also repeat the previous action.

Important: If the Undo commands and To repeat are not available, the previous actions cannot be repeated.

Top of page

Preventing work from lost work

Undo can really save the day, but it's no substitute for saving your work regularly. You can use backup and restore, as well as application parts (a type of template), to prevent loss of work due to errors or crashes.

Save and recover

Before starting any major design revision, make a backup of the database. Then if you make a number of design changes and cannot undo all of them, you can restore as much from the backup as you need. For more information, see the article Protecting Your Data with Backup and Restore Processes.

Application parts

If there are standard components that you will use in most or all of your databases, consider creating an Application Part. An application part is a type of template that you can add to an existing database and that can consist of one or more database objects with or without data.

After adding an application part, you can change it as needed. If you make design mistakes or just decide you don't like the changes you've made, you can delete the revised objects and add the applied part again. For more information, see the article Saving and Reusing Database Design Elements.

Top of page