How does BPD compare to narcissists

Gender differences in borderline personality disorder

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate gender differences and similarities in patients with BPD with regard to comorbid axis I and axis II disorders according to DSM-IV, dimensional personality profiles and specific symptom areas of BPD. Methods: 57 men and 114 women with BPD were included in the study. Axis I disorders were recorded on the basis of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.), Axis II disorders on the basis of the structured clinical interview according to DSM-IV (SKID-II). Differences in dimensional personality profiles were determined using the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Profile (DAPP-BQ). On the basis of disorder-specific instruments such as Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), questionnaires for recording aggression (FAF), anger expression inventory (STAXI), state trait fear inventory (STAI), questionnaires on dissociative symptoms (FDS), barrate impulsivity scale ( BIS), borderline symptom list (BSL), PTSD diagnostic scale (PDS) and symptom checklist (SCL-90-R), specific symptom areas of BPD were examined with regard to gender differences. Results: Significantly higher prevalence rates for bulimia nervosa, post-traumatic stress disorder and agoraphobia with panic disorder were found in women with BPD. The male borderline group fulfilled the diagnoses of a binge eating disorder, an antisocial and narcissistic personality disorder significantly more frequently than the female borderline group. With regard to dimensional personality factors based on the NEO-PI-R, women with BPD had significantly higher scores in the superordinate scales of neuroticism and tolerability as well as in the subscales of anxiety, depression, vulnerability, modesty and altruism. In the DAPP-BQ profile, men with BPD had significantly higher scores in the superordinate dimension of anti-social behavior and in the subscales stimulus search, behavior problems and heartlessness. Women had higher scores on the DAPP-BQ subscales of anxiety, submissiveness, and intimacy problems. On the basis of the other survey instruments used, it could be shown that women with BPD have a greater affective instability and higher dissociation values ‚Äč‚Äčthan men with BPD. With regard to the symptom areas anger / outbursts of anger, instability of identity and impulsivity, no significant gender-specific differences could be demonstrated. Conclusion: Despite proven gender differences with regard to comorbid psychiatric diagnoses and dimensional personality profiles, it could be shown that men and women with BPD show more similarities than differences. These similarities between the two study groups also manifested themselves in the specific symptom areas of BPD.


The aim of the study was to investigate gender differences and similarities in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) with respect to axis I comorbidity, axis II comorbidity, general psychopathology (Symptom Checklist 90-Revised), and dimensional personality traits (NEO-Personality -Inventory Revised, NEO-PI-R, and the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Profile Basic questionnaire, DAPP-BQ). Fifty-seven men and 114 women with BPD were included in the study. Regarding axis I and II disorders, men with BPD more often fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for binge eating disorder, antisocial personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, and conduct disorder in childhood, whereas women had higher frequencies of bulimia nervosa, posttraumatic stress disorder, and panic disorder with agoraphobia. In the SCL-90-R profile, no significant gender differences could be identified. In the dimensional personality traits, women showed higher rates on the NEO-PI-R main factors (Neuroticism and Agreeableness) compared to men. In the DAPP-BQ profile, men reached higher sores on the main factor, dissocial behavior. Our results argue for gender differences in axis I and II comorbidity and dimensional personality traits in BPD. However, in general, more similarities than differences were shown in this study.