How has minimalism changed your life

That brings minimalism: How the less has changed me

Part 1 of the text (“My way from veganism to minimalism”) is available here.

What has all of this minimizing - which is now far from over - actually brought us? A lot, a lot. It has affected our lives in a way that can almost be described as upsetting.

Place!

Quite trivial, but yes: We could move back into our former cute 60-square-meter apartment without batting an eyelid and would certainly still have more than enough space.

No more junk that clogs the shelves, catches the eye and that you have to wipe around in a complicated way (or not). No weekly groans because you don't know what to do with the new hobbies you just shopped. No mess that can't be cleaned up in ten minutes. In short: we. To have. Place.

Sometimes I am still completely in love with our new old rooms, which, despite the age of the house and although the apartment does not correspond to my personal living dream, look like changed by the less. A bit like they put on their wedding dress.

What do I actually want? Style finding and identity discovery

But reducing also brings with it a completely different, at least as essential advantage, which is of course closely linked to the first one: you suddenly know what you want. Find his own style. At least that's what happened to me - and the consequences of this discovery continue to this day.

The problem with having a lot is not only that the objects take up physical space, but that they do the same on the psychological level.

The problem with having a lot is not only that the objects take up physical space, but that they do the same on the psychological level. Specifically, this means: Due to the unbelievable flood of things that somehow all do not fit together, were bought with affect and found to be singular, but not collectively beautiful, I couldn't develop a real style in the sense that I really knew what I actually want.

How I dress, how I want to design my apartment. Which style I want to base my life on and what that actually says about me. These are things that I had given very little thought to before - I just bought what the advertisements told me to be worth buying. This resulted in an insane mix of colors, styles, patterns, shades, implied first-person designs that were never thought through to the end. A chaos.

When we began to radically throw out the superfluous things, the mentioned freedom / relief came not only because of the spatial space: With every part that I parted with because I knew that (for whatever reason) it was not ( more) belonged to me, didn't care anymore, so I couldn't identify with him - with each of these rejected parts I automatically knew a little more about how I wanted to design myself in the future and who I actually was.

Identification through rejection - the oldest of all games took hold here too. It was a bit as if the objects had not only blocked the rooms of our apartment, but also those of my soul.

focus on the essentials

The last effect that a turn to minimalism has had for us, resulting from other things, is the concentration on the essentials - in all areas of life.

It starts with simply looking through the room, which is suddenly so much easier for the eye because the corresponding space is not full of colorful, jumbled blobs of color, and ends with a general relaxation of what to buy, not to buy, to use up and that Life in general.

We no longer have to walk into the shopping mile every Saturday and stock up on clothes to feel good. Instead, we use the time to ourselves, read a good book, write, or spend time together.

We do not stress ourselves because we have seen object xy with this or that person (or in advertising - which, by the way, we hardly consume any more) and now we absolutely and immediately need to have exactly that. We don't have to.

We have become more creative - after all, potatoes are always in the house. Make something of what is there. Exert ‘your head.

We don't necessarily have to go shopping if we don't feel like doing it now. Then we'll go tomorrow. We have become more creative - after all, potatoes are always in the house. Make something of what is there. Exert ‘your head.

Relaxation

It's a fundamental I-don't-have-to-have-anything-relief that minimalism has given us. A little (much) better quality of life, even though we didn't become millionaires or heirs overnight. A little more satisfaction with ourselves and life.

Have you had similar experiences with minimalism?

P.S .: For the sake of simplicity, I have always spoken of ourselves as “minimalists” in this article. I don't know if there is even a generally valid definition of the term - but we don't want to commit ourselves to a label that should stick to us like the proverbial fly on honey. We are not owners of 100 things, we are not consumer ascetics. We only pay a little attention to what we do - and for this the term “minimalist” has become established in the discourse, which we therefore also use here.