What is the curriculum for ACET 2016

Internal school curriculum for the core curriculum for the upper level Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Chemistry as of November 2016

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1 subject chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Internal school curriculum for the core curriculum for the upper level Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund chemistry as of November 2016

2 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Contents 1 The Chemistry Department at the Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium - General 1 2 Lesson decisions Introductory phase Overview grid of teaching projects in the introductory phase Specified teaching projects Introductory phase Qualification phase Q1 Basic course Overview grid of teaching projects in the qualification phase (Q1) GK Concretized teaching projects qualification phase Q1 GK qualification phase Q2 Basic course Concrete teaching projects qualification phase (Q2) GK principles of performance evaluation and performance feedback Teaching and learning materials 75 3 Decisions on cross-disciplinary and cross-curricular issues 76 4 Quality development, assurance and evaluation 77 2

3 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund 1 The Chemistry Department at the Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium - General Concept for the Subject Chemistry Chemistry lessons should arouse interest in scientific issues and connect with the world of the students. The general chemistry lessons in the classes and courses are also the place to develop chemistry-specific competencies in the sense of the core curriculum. An important goal is environmental, health and safety education, as well as the promotion of cooperative and social skills, and chemistry classes are intended to provide the basis for learning in this area during studies and work. In addition, the pupils should be given the opportunity to test and train their enthusiasm and willingness to perform in the subject of chemistry in competitions. Equipment / media At the Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium there are 2 chemistry rooms (D102 and D104) available, in which you can work experimentally. In addition, the rooms are each equipped with a projector, a projection screen, an overhead projector, a document camera and a computer with Internet access. The chemistry collection is well equipped with equipment and materials for demonstration and student experiments. The Chemistry Student Council is particularly interested in promoting experimentation in all grades. Various multimedia rooms with internet access at the school can be used for detailed research in groups. Lesson distribution The lesson timing at the school follows a 60 minute grid. The distribution of the number of hours per week in secondary level I and II is as follows: Year Number of hours per week Half-year 1 Half-year EF 2.25 2.25 Q1 2.25 2.25 Q2 2.25 2.25 1

4 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund 2 Decisions on the lesson 2.1 Introductory phase Overview grid of the lesson plans in the introductory phase Lesson plan I: Context: Not only graphite and diamond Appearances of carbon Focal points of overarching competence expectations: UF4 Networking E6 Models E7 Working methods and ways of thinking K3 Presentation Content field : Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Main focus: Nanochemistry of carbon Time required: approx. 6 hours of 60 minutes each Teaching project III: Context: Methods of calcium removal in the household Focus of overarching competence expectations: UF1 Reproduction UF3 Systematization E3 Hypotheses E5 Evaluation K1 Documentation Contents: Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Introductory phase of the teaching project II: Context: From alcohol to flavoring Focal points of overarching competence expectations: UF2 Selection UF3 Systematisation E2 Perception and measurement E4 Exam Research and experiments K 2 Research K3 Presentation B1 Criteria B2 Decisions Subject area: Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Focus on content: Organic (and inorganic) carbon compounds Time required: approx. 28 hours of 60 min Teaching project IV: Context: Carbon dioxide and the climate The importance of the oceans Focus Overarching competence expectations: E1 Problems and questions E4 Investigations and experiments K4 Argumentation B3 Values ​​and norms B4 Possibilities and limits Contents: carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Main focus: 2

5 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Main focus: equilibrium reactions Time required: approx. 20 hours of 60 minutes (organic and) inorganic carbon compounds Equilibrium reactions Material cycle in nature Time required: approx. 8 hours of 60 minutes Total introductory phase: 62 hours 3

6 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Specified lesson plans Introductory phase Introductory phase Lesson project I Context: Not just graphite and diamond Appearances of carbon Basic concepts (focus): Basic concept Structure Property Focus of overarching competence expectations: Competence area Dealing with specialist knowledge: Existing knowledge based on new chemical experiences and findings modify and reorganize (UF4). Competence area acquisition of knowledge: Select models in a justified manner and use them to describe, explain and predict chemical processes, also in simple formalized or mathematical form (E6). Describe the meaning, but also the provisional nature of scientific rules, laws and theories using selected examples (E7). Competency area communication: presenting chemical issues, work results and findings in a way that is appropriate to the target audience and is formally, linguistically and technically correct in short presentations or short specialist texts (K3). Content: Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Main focus: Nanochemistry of carbon Time required: approx. 6 hours of 60 minutes 4

7 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Introductory phase - Teaching project I Context: Not just graphite and diamond Forms of carbon Contents: Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Main focus: Carbon - an element with many faces Nanochemistry of carbon Time required: 6 hours of 60 minutes sequencing in terms of content Specified competency expectations Aspects of the core curriculum graphite, diamond and more - Modification - Electron pair bonding - Structural formulas The students ... use known atom and bond models to describe organic molecules and carbon modifications (E6). use structural formulas to make assumptions about the properties of selected substances and suggest suitable experiments for verification (E3). explain the limits of the attachment models known to them (E7). describe the structures of diamond and graphite and compare them with new materials made of carbon (including fullerenes) (UF4). Main focus of overarching competence expectations: UF4 Networking E6 Models E7 Working and thinking methods K3 Presentation Basic concept (focus): Basic concept Structure Property Possible teaching aids / materials / methods 1. Self-assessment test including atomic structure, bond theory, carbon atom, periodic table 2. Group work on graphite, diamond and fullerenes , possibly silicates e.g. in the form of a group puzzle (molecular kits, modeling balloons, Avogadro program) 5 binding agreements Didactic and methodological notes The introduction serves to harmonize the knowledge of attachment theory, additional material may have to be made available. In the case of graphite and fullerene, the limits of the simple bond models become clear. (Caution: without hybridization) Researching nanomaterials is guided and provided with the 1. Research on new materials made of coal.

8 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund - Nanotechnology - New Materials - Applications - Risks Questions give rise to questions about the properties and uses of selected substances and present the research results in a way that is appropriate for the target group (K2, K3). present new materials made of carbon and describe their properties (K3). use an example to evaluate the opportunities and risks of nanotechnology (B4). substance and problems of nanotechnology (e.g. carbon nanotubes in composite materials to improve electrical conductivity in plastics) - structure - production - use - risks - special features e.g. in the form of a ball bearing nanomaterials made of carbon 2. Presentation (e.g. poster, power point presentation, museum tour) The presentation is not limited to materials made of carbon. In the case of research assignments, the pupils can independently develop questions. (Differentiation of levels, individual support) The pupils create study posters in groups; on the museum tour, everyone gives a short lecture. Materials for evaluating the nanoproducts: e.g. Structured controversy, journalist method, play dicide game, pro and contra debate (panel discussion) Diagnosis of the performance level of the students: Self-evaluation sheet for attachment theory Performance evaluation / feedback: Evaluation of group work on graphite, diamond and fullerenes and a presentation to evaluate the nanoproducts, if necessary, a test and Written exercise Examples of further information: A group work on diamond, graphite and fullerenes can be found on the website of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich: Numerous materials and information have been published on the subject of nanotechnology, e.g. FCI, information series Wunderwelt der Nanomaterialien (incl. DVD and experiments) Klaus Müllen, graphs from the chemistry laboratory, in: Spectrum of Science 8/12 Sebastian Witte, Die magic substance, GEO compact No.

9 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund 7

10 Competence area assessment: for assessments in scientific and technical contexts, specify assessment criteria and weight them justified (B1) for assessments in chemical and application-related contexts, weigh up arguments based on criteria and take a well-founded point of view (B2) content area: carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions thematic focus: organic (and inorganic) carbon compounds Time required: approx. 28 hours of 60 min 8

11 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Introductory Phase - Lesson Project II Context: From alcohol to flavoring Content area: Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Main focus: Organic (and inorganic) carbon compounds Time required: 28 hours of 60 minutes Main focus of overarching competence expectations: UF 2 Selection of UF3 systematisation E2 Perception and measurement E4 Investigations and experiments K2 Research K3 Presentation B1 Criteria B2 Decisions Sequencing of content-related aspects When wine tips over Oxidation of ethanol to ethanoic acid Establishment of the redox scheme using oxidation numbers Rules for setting up redox schemes Specified competence expectations of the core curriculum The students ... Explain the oxidation series of alcohols on a molecular level and assign oxidation numbers to the atoms (UF2). Describe observations of experiments on oxidation series of alcohols and interpret them under the aspect of the donor-acceptor principle (E2, E6) Basic concepts (focus): Basic concept Structure Property Basic concept Donor-acceptor Possible teaching aids / materials / methods Test for initial diagnosis MindMap demonstration e.g. from two bottles of wine, one of which has been open for 2 weeks. pH value determination, smell, color of wine and overturned wine Binding agreements Didactic and methodological notes Creation of a mind map that is expanded in the course of the lesson sequence Diagnosis: Terms that should be known from secondary level I: functional groups, hydroxyl group , intermolecular interactions 9

12 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Alcohol in the human body Ethanal as an intermediate product of oxidation Detection of the alkanals Biological effects of alcohol Calculation of the blood alcohol content Alcohol test with the Dräger tube (optional) Create order: Classification of organic compounds into substance classes Alkanes and alcohols as solvents Solubility Functional Group document experiments in appropriate technical language (e.g. to investigate the properties of organic compounds) (K1). Show advantages and disadvantages of selected everyday products (including flavorings, alcohols) and their applications, weight them and take a well-founded position on their use (B1, B2) use known atomic and bond models to describe organic molecules and carbon modifications (E6). Name selected organic compounds using the rules of systematic nomenclature (IUPAC) (UF3) Concept map or group work on the effects of alcohol Student experiment: Fehling and Tollens test Optional: Level-differentiated task on the redox scheme of the alcohol test reaction Student experiment: Solubility of alcohols and alkanes in different Solvent worksheets: reactions, redox reactions, electron donor / acceptor, electronegativity, acid, acidic solutions. After evaluation of the test: Provision of individual funding material for repetition

13 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Intermolecular interactions: van-der-waals interactions and hydrogen bonds Homologous series and physical properties Nomenclature according to IUPAC Formula notation: ratio, sum and structural formula Use of selected alcohols Alkanals, alkanones and carboxylic acids - oxidation products of the alkanols Oxidation of propanol differentiation primary. Secondary and tertiary acanols due to their oxidisability Framework and positional isomerism using the example of propanols Molecular models Homologous series Classify organic compounds into substance classes based on their functional groups (UF3) Explain the CC linkage principle (UF2) on compounds from the substance classes of alkanes and alkenes Construction of a homologous series and the structural isomerism (skeletal isomerism and positional isomerism) using the example of alkanes and alcohols ((UF1, UF3) Explanation of selected properties of organic compounds with interactions between the molecules (including hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces) (UF1, UF3 ) Describe and visualize the structures of organic compounds using suitable illustrative models (K3) Select the appropriate formula notation for the representation of chemical facts (ratio, sum structural formula) (K3) Describe the structure of a homologous series and the structural isomerism (skeletal isomeri e and positional isomerism) using the example of alkanes and alcohols (UF1, UF3) -Nomenclature rules and exercises -intermolecular interactions Student experiments: -oxidation of propanol with copper oxide -oxidation ability of primary, secondary and tertiary alkanols e.g. with KMnO 4 Group work: Representation of isomers with molecular construction kits Interdisciplinary aspect: Intermolecular interactions are the subject of EF in Biology (e.g. protein structures) Repetition: Acids and acidic solutions 11

14 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund of the acanals, alkanones and carboxylic acids Nomenclature of the substance classes and functional groups Properties and uses Flavors in food a) Flavors in gummy bears Gas chromatography to detect the flavors Structure and function of a gas chromatograph Identification of the flavors by evaluating gas chromatograms Before - and disadvantages of artificial flavorings Assessment of the use of flavorings, e.g. from artificial explanations the fundamentals of the creation of a gas chromatogram and take from this information for the identification of a substance (E5) guidance guided and independent chemistry-specific tables and reference works for planning and evaluation of experiments and for the determination of substance properties (K2) Describing connections between occurrence, use and properties Important representatives of the substance classes of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and esters (UF2) Explain the CC linkage principle (UF2) on compounds from the substance classes of alkanes and alkenes. Analyze statements on organic chemistry products (including from advertising) with regard to your chemical gas chromatography: animation worksheets: - basic principle of a gas chromatograph structure and mode of operation - gas chromatograms of food flavorings Discussion: advantages and disadvantages of artificial flavorings in yogurt, cheese substitutes and other foods 12

15 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Flavors in yoghurt, cheese substitute etc. Facts and correct inaccurate statements factually founded. (K4) Classes of esters and alkenes: functional groups, substance properties, structure-property relationships b) Synthesis of flavorings, ester synthesis, comparison of the solubility of the starting materials (alkanol, carboxylic acid) and products (ester, water), esterification as an incomplete reaction, properties, structures and uses of organic substances Advantages and disadvantages of selected everyday products (including flavorings, alcohols) and their applications, weight them and take a well-founded position on their use (B1, B2) Assign esterification reactions to the type of reaction of the condensation reaction (UF1) Carry out qualitative tests based on a given question and log the observations (includingto investigate the properties of organic compounds) (E2, E4) Use structural formulas to make assumptions about the properties of selected substances and propose suitable experiments for checking (E3). K2, K3) Describe the relationships between occurrence, use and properties of important representatives of the substance classes of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and esters (UF2) Experiment (teacher demonstration) Synthesis of ethyl acetate and analysis of the products Student experiments on the synthesis of aromatic substances (fruit esters) (e.g. division of labor) Group work: Representation of the starting materials and products of the ester synthesis with molecular kits Research and presentation: Properties and use of organic substances Interdisciplinary aspect: Esterification of amino acids to polypeptides in the EF The variety of possible uses of organic substances with reference to their functional groups and substance properties should be presented. Possible topics: Esters as a solution 13

16 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Medium for adhesives and varnishes, flavorings and smelling processes, carboxylic acids as antioxidants in preservation, terpenes as secondary plant substances Diagnosis of student concepts: initial diagnosis Feedback / performance evaluation: Protocols for teacher and student experiments (e.g. solubility of alcohols , Oxidation of alcohols), presentation of the work results, if necessary, a written test, written exercise Examples of further information: Internet source for downloading freely available programs for creating mind and concept maps: Material on the effects of alcohol on the human body: Flavors in food : Virtual gas chromatograph: 14

1720 hours of 60 minutes 15

18 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Introductory Phase - Lesson Project III Context: Methods for removing limescale in the household Contents: Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Main focus: equilibrium reactions Time required: 20 hours of 60 minutes Main focus of overarching competence expectations: UF1 Reproduction of UF3 Systematization E4 Investigations and experiments E5 Evaluation E3 Hypotheses K1 Documentation Sequencing of content-related aspects Binding agreements Didactic-methodical remarks Lime removal Reaction of lime with acids Observation of the course of a reaction Calculating the reaction rate Specified competence expectations of the core curriculum The pupils ... Plan quantitative experiments (e.g. to investigate the temporal course of a chemical reaction ), carry them out in a targeted manner and document the results (E2, E4). For reactions to investigate the speed of reaction, show the metabolism of substances as a function of time in tables and graphs (K1) Explain the course of a chemical reaction under the aspect of speed as a difference quotient Basic concepts (focus): Basic concept Structure Property Basic concept Chemical equilibrium Possible teaching aids / materials / Methods Warning: Do not use acids to remove limescale from sensitive surfaces Problem: Remove limescale from sensitive surfaces with hydrochloric acid and acetic acid Ideas for examining the time sequence Student experiment: Planning, carrying out and evaluating a corresponding experiment (e.g. collecting the gas) Task: Determining reaction speeds using an example Repetition: Amount of substance n, mass m, molar mass M and molar concentration c S. calculate the reaction rates for different time intervals in the course of the chem. Response 16

19 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund c / t (UF1). Influence on the reaction speed Possible influence parameters (concentration, temperature, degree of fragmentation) Collision hypothesis Velocity law for bimolecular reactions RGT rule Formulate hypotheses on the influence of various factors on the reaction speed and develop experiments to check them (E3) Interpret the time sequence chem. Reactions depending on various parameters (including surface, concentration, temperature) (E5) Explain the chronological sequence of chem. Reactions based on simple models at the molecular level (including impact theory only for gases) (E6) Can that also be done faster? Student experiments based on division of labor: Dependency of the reaction speed on the concentration, the degree of fragmentation and the temperature Development: Impact theory, interpretation of the possible influences, simple rate law, predictions Discussion: RGT rule, inaccuracies in predictions Simulation Describe and assess opportunities and limits of influencing the reaction speed (B1) Chemical equilibrium - definition - description at particle level - model concepts explain the characteristics of a chemical equilibrium state using selected examples (UF1). Lecture by the teacher: Chemical equilibrium as a general principle of many chemical reactions, definition of worksheet: Describing reversible reactions at particle level, simulation, if necessary, and explaining chemical equilibrium with the help of models (E6). Model experiment: e.g. Plunger experiment, ball game Comparative consideration: chemical equilibrium on the particle 17

20 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Chemical equilibrium quantitative back and forth reaction Law of mass action Example reactions Influence of temperature Supplementation of collision hypothesis Activation energy Formulate the law of mass action (UF3) for selected equilibrium reactions Interpret equilibrium constants in relation to the equilibrium position (UF4) Document experiments in appropriate technical language (for Setting an equilibrium reaction) (K1) Describe and assess the opportunities and limits of influencing the reaction rate and the chem. Equilibrium (B1) Interpret a simple energy-reaction path diagram (E5, K3) Describe and explain the influence of a catalyst on the reaction rate with the help of given graphical representations (UF1, UF3) level, in the model and in reality Worksheet: From the reaction rate to the chemical equilibrium Teacher's lecture: Introduction of the law of mass action Exercises Repetition: Energy in chem. Reactions in class: Introduction of the activation energy Student experiment: Catalysts, e.g. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide Diagnosis of student concepts: Learning diagnosis: amount of substance, molar mass and concentration of substance amount Performance evaluation: written exams, written exercises, protocols, presentations, 18th

21 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Introductory Phase - Lesson Project IV Context: Carbon Dioxide and the Climate The Importance of the Oceans Basic Concepts (Focus): Basic Concept Structure Property Basic Concept Chemical Equilibrium Priorities of overarching competence expectations: The students can acquire knowledge of the competence area: in given situations chemical Describe problems, break them down into sub-problems and specify questions (E1). In compliance with safety regulations, plan and carry out simple experiments in a targeted manner and consider possible errors (E4). Competency area communication: justify or criticize chemical statements and assertions with well-founded and convincing arguments (K4). Competency area assessment: depicting ethical conflicts in known contexts when dealing with chemical issues as well as possible conflict solutions (B3). Present the possibilities and limits of chemical and application-related problem solutions and perspectives with reference to the objectives of the natural sciences (B4). Content area: Carbon compounds and equilibrium reactions Main focus: (organic and) inorganic carbon compounds Equilibrium reactions Material cycle in nature Time required: approx. 8 hours of 60 minutes each 19

22 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Introductory Phase - Lesson Project IV Context: Carbon Dioxide and the Climate The Importance for the Oceans Contents: Carbon Compounds and Equilibrium Reactions Main Focus: Material Cycle in Nature Equilibrium Reactions Time required: 8 hours of 60 minutes sequencing of content-related aspects Carbon dioxide - Properties - greenhouse effect - anthropogenic emissions - reaction equations - handling of size equations Specified competence expectations of the core curriculum The students ... distinguish between the natural and the anthropogenically generated greenhouse effect and describe selected causes and their consequences (E1). Focal points of overarching competence expectations: E1 Problems and questions E4 Investigations and experiments K4 Argumentation B3 Values ​​and norms B4 Possibilities and limits Basic concepts (focus): Basic concept Structure Property Basic concept Chemical balance Possible teaching aids / materials / methods Map query Terms on the subject of carbon dioxide Information properties / greenhouse effect e.g. Newspaper article Calculations for the formation of CO 2 from coal and fuels (alkanes) - Creation of reaction equations - Calculation of the CO 2 s formed - Comparison with legal requirements - Worldwide CO 2 emissions Information uptake of CO 2 by the oceans among other things 20 binding agreements Didactic methodological remarks The introduction serves as a link to previous knowledge from the SI and other subjects. Implicit repetition: amount of substance n, mass m and molar mass M

23 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Solubility of CO 2 in water - qualitative - formation of an acidic solution - quantitative - incompleteness of the reaction - reversibility Specification of a table for the relationship between pH value and oxonium ion concentration chemical equilibrium - definition - description at particle level - Model presentations carry out qualitative tests with a given question and record the observations (e.g. to investigate the properties of organic compounds) (E2, E4). document experiments in appropriate technical language (e.g. to investigate the properties of organic compounds, to establish an equilibrium reaction, to substances and reactions in a natural cycle) (K1). use, guided and independent, chemistry-specific tables and reference works for planning and evaluating experiments and for determining substance properties (K2). explain the characteristics of a state of chemical equilibrium using selected examples (UF1). Student experiment: Solubility of CO 2 in water (qualitative) Creation of reaction equations Teacher's lecture: Solubility of CO 2 (quantitative): - Solubility of CO 2 in g / l - Calculation of the expected oxonium ion concentration - Use of a table for the expected pH value - Comparison with the actual pH value result: incompleteness of the reaction in progress Teacher experiment: solubility of CO 2 when hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide solution is added Result: reversibility / reversibility of the reaction Teacher's lecture: Chemical equilibrium as a general principle of many chemical reactions, definition of worksheet: Reversible reactions at particle level, simulation if necessary Repetition of the molar concentration c Repetition: Criteria for experimental protocols Ocean and equilibria describe and explain the chemical equilibrium with the help of models (E6). formulate hypotheses for influencing natural material cycles (including carbon model experiment: e.g. stick experiment, ball game Comparative consideration: chemical equilibrium on the particle level, in the model and in reality Repetition: CO 2 absorption in the oceans Here only Le Chatelier's principle, none 21

24 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund - Recording of CO 2 - Influence of the ocean conditions on the solubility of CO 2 - Le Chatelier's principle - Cycles of climate change - Information in the media - Possibilities for solving the CO 2 problem of substance dioxide carbonate cycle) (E3). explain how the equilibrium position is influenced by a change in concentration (or a change in the amount of substance), a change in temperature (or a supply or withdrawal of heat) and a change in pressure (or a change in volume) (UF3) using selected reactions. formulate questions on the problem of the fate and influence of anthropogenically generated carbon dioxide (e.g. in the sea), taking into account equilibria (E1). illustrate chemical reactions to the carbon dioxide-carbonate cycle graphically or by symbols (K3). research information (including on the carbon dioxide-carbonate cycle) from various sources and structure and question the statements of the information (K2, K4). describe the provisional nature of the statements of forecasts on climate change (E7). describe and evaluate the social relevance of the predicted consequences of the anthropogenic greenhouse effect (B3). show possibilities and chances of the student experiments: Influence of pressure and temperature on the solubility of CO2, possibly influence of the salt content on the solubility Influence of chemical equilibria (generalization) Puzzle method: Influence of pressure, temperature and concentration on equilibria, predictions Elaboration: Where does it go CO 2 in the ocean? Partner work: Physical / biological carbon pump Worksheet: Graphic representation of the marine carbon dioxide cycle Research - current developments - ocean acidification - influence on the Gulf Stream / North Atlantic Current Panel discussion - forecasts - proposals for reducing emissions - use of CO 2 Summary: e.g. Greenhouse Earth film from the Total Phenomenal series by SWR MWG Optional: Possible additions (also for individual funding): - Dripstone caves - Limestone cycle - Corals 22

25 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions and the storage of carbon dioxide on and include political and social arguments Further research and ethical standards in their evaluation (B3, B4). Performance evaluation: Written exams, written exercises, protocols, presentations, exemplary references to further information: Detailed background information and experimental suggestions for the absorption of CO 2 in the oceans can be found e.g. at: ftp://ftp.rz.uni-kiel.de/pub/ipn/systemerde/09_begleittext_ol.pdf The Max Planck Society presents current research on the subject of carbon dioxide and the climate in several issues: Information on the film Greenhouse Earth: 23

26 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund 2.2 Qualification phase Q1 basic course Overview grid of the teaching projects in the qualification phase (Q1) GK qualification phase (Q1) BASIC COURSE Teaching project I: Teaching project II: Context: Acids and bases in everyday products: Determining the concentration of acetic acid in food : UF1 Reproduction E2 Perception and measurement E4 Investigations and experiments E5 Evaluation K1 Documentation K2 Research Contents: Acids, bases and analytical methods Main focus: Properties and structure of acids and bases Determination of the concentration of acids and bases Time required: approx. 12 hours of 60 minutes Lesson project III Context: Electricity for flashlights and mobile phones Main focus of overarching competence expectations: UF3 Systematisation UF4 Networking E2 Perception and measurement E4 Investigations and experiments E6 Models 24 Context: Acids and bases in everyday language Products: Strong and weak acids and bases Main focus of overarching competence expectations: UF2 Selection UF3 Systematisation E1 Problems and questions B1 Criteria Content field: Acids, bases and analytical methods Main focus: Properties and structure of acids and bases Determination of the concentration of acids and bases Time required: 11 hours. 60 minutes each Lesson project IV: Context: From water electrolysis to fuel cells Main focus of overarching competence expectations: UF2 Selection E6 Models E7 Networking K1 Documentation K4 Argumentation

27 Subject Chemistry Bert-Brecht-Gymnasium Dortmund K2 Research B2 Decisions B1 Criteria B3 Values ​​and norms Content: Electrochemistry Main focus: Mobile energy sources Time required: approx. 16 hours of 45 minutes Lesson project V: Context: Corrosion destroys values ​​Main focus of overarching competence expectations: UF1 rendering UF3 Systematisation E6 Models B2 Decisions Contents: Electrochemistry Main focus: Corrosion Time required: approx. 5 hours of 45 minutes Contents: Electrochemistry Main focus: Mobile energy sources Electrochemical extraction of substances Time needed: approx. 11 hours of 45 minutes Teaching project VI: Context: From fossil fuels Raw material for the application product Focal points of overarching competence expectations: UF3 Systematisation UF4 Networking E3 Hypotheses E 4 Investigations and experiments K3 Presentation B3 Values ​​and standards Content area: Organic products, materials and dyes Main focus: Organic V Connections and reaction paths Time required: approx. 10 hours of 45 minutes each, total qualification phase (Q1) BASIC COURSE: 65 hours 25

28 2.2.2 Specified teaching project Qualification phase Q1 GK Q1 Basic course Teaching project I Context: Acids and bases in everyday products: Determining the concentration of acetic acid in food Basic concepts (focus): Basic concept donor-acceptor Basic concept Structure-property Basic concept Chemical equilibrium Focus of overarching competence expectations: The students can competence area dealing with specialist knowledge: describe and explain phenomena and facts in connection with theories, overriding principles and laws of chemistry (UF1). Competence area acquisition of knowledge: explain complex apparatus for observations and measurements and use them appropriately (E2). Explain experiments with reference to their objectives and carry them out with reference to technical quality criteria including the safety regulations or describe their implementation (E4). Analyze data / measured values ​​qualitatively and quantitatively with regard to interrelationships, rules or laws to be formulated mathematically and generalize results (E5). Competence area communication: Use correct technical language and customary presentation methods when documenting investigations, experiments, theoretical considerations and problem solving (K1). Research, evaluate and compare relevant information and data on chemical and application-related issues in various sources, including in selected scientific publications (K2). Contents: Acids, bases and analytical processes Main focus: Properties and structure of acids and bases Determination of the concentration of acids and bases by titration Time required: approx. 12 hours of 60 minutes 26

29 Q1 Basic Course Teaching Project I Context: Acids and bases in everyday products: Determination of the concentration of acetic acid in food Contents: Acids, bases and analytical methods Main focus: Properties and structure of acids and bases Determination of the concentration of acids and bases by titration Perception and measurement E4 Investigations and experiments E5 Evaluation K1 Documentation K2 Research Time required: 12 hours of 60 minutes sequencing of content-related aspects Use of acetic acid and determination of acidity in food Specified competence expectations of the core curriculum The pupils. research on everyday products that contain acids and bases and discuss different statements on their use in a manner appropriate to the target group (K2, K4). Basic concepts (focus): basic concept structure-property basic concept chemical equilibrium basic concept donor-acceptor possible teaching aids / materials / methods demonstration of foods containing acetic acid binding agreements didactic-methodological notes neutralization reaction titration with assess the use, the effectiveness and the hazard potential of acids and bases in everyday products (B1, vinegar essence a hazardous substance? Integrated thematization of safety aspects: Missing hazardous substance- 27

30 End point determination Calculation of the acid content B2). symbols on the vinegar essence bottle reference to differences in the labeling of chemicals and food plan experiments to determine the concentration of acids and bases in everyday products or samples from the environment guided and independently (E1, E3). explain the process of acid-base titration with endpoint determination using an indicator, carry it out in a targeted manner and evaluate it (E3, E4, E5). evaluate the quality of products and environmental parameters on the basis of analysis results on acid-base reactions (B1). Student experiment: titration with endpoint determination (determination of the acetic acid content in different types of vinegar) worksheet or introduced textbook, elaboration e.g. B. in the learning pace module: Exercises on concentration calculations Repetition: substance concentration, neutralization as a reaction between oxonium and hydroxide ion, indicators, determination of substance concentration, mass concentration and mass fraction of acid content measurement from Aceto Balsamico evaluate the analysis results obtained through own experiments on acid-base reactions with regard to their informative value (including naming and weighting sources of error) (E4, E5). describe the method of conductivity titration (the current strength is sufficient as a measured variable) to determine the concentration of acids Student experiment: Conductivity titration of balsamic vinegar with sodium hydroxide solution. (Simplified conductometric conductivity titration as a method for determining the concentration of 28

31 Conductivity titration Error discussion In-depth and application: Graphs of conductivity titrations of different strengths and weaknesses of acids and bases or bases in samples from everyday products or the environment and evaluate existing measurement data (E2, E4, E5). document the results of a conductivity titration using graphical representations (K1). explain the phenomenon of electrical conductivity in aqueous solutions with the presence of freely mobile ions (E6). Titration: Measurement of the current strength against the volume) Group work (if necessary, division of labor): Graphical representation of the measurement results Interpretation of the results of the conductivity titration taking into account the relative conductivity of the ions Processing of materials for the diagnosis of pupils' imaginations as well as other learning tasks Acids in colored solutions is presented. Measured variables for specifying the conductivity Optional deepening or possibilities of differentiation: Consideration of the conductivity titration of multi-protonic acids Precipitation titration for the purpose of determining the chloride ion concentration in aquarium water (see UV II) Acid regulators in food - The functional acid-base term acidic and basic salt solutions Protolysis reactions identify acids and bases in everyday products and describe them using Brønsted's acid-base concept (UF1, UF3). use protolysis reactions to show how the acid-base concept has changed due to Brønsted's concept Acetates and other salts as food additives to regulate acidity - are aqueous solutions of salts neutral? Student experiment: investigation of sodium acetate - use of materials to diagnose student ideas (see notes below) Repetition of Le Chatelier's principle to explain the reaction of acetate with acetic acid 29

32 conjugated acid-base pairs (E6, E7). represent an acid-base reaction in a functional diagram and explain the donor-acceptor principle (K1, K3). Solution and other saline solutions, e.g. with bromothymol blue Result: different salt solutions have pH values ​​in the neutral, acidic and alkaline range. Worksheet or introduced textbook: Acid-base theory according to Brønsted Exercises on conjugated acid-base pairs Regulation of the acid content, e.g. of acetic acid solution through acetate (qualitative) Colloquia and, if necessary, written exercise Diagnosis of student concepts: Materials for diagnosing student ideas, learning tasks Performance evaluation: Colloquia, protocols, written exercises Notes on a selection of further materials and information: - For learning tasks on acids and bases, see - Petermann , Friedrich, Barke, Oetken: Acid-base reactions. A lesson based on student ideas. In: PdNCh 3 (2011) 60, S materials on various titrations, among others for:

33 on vinegar, among others: 31

34 Q1 Basic Course Teaching Project II Context: Acids and Bases in Everyday Products: Strong and Weak Acids and Bases Basic Concepts (Focus): Basic Concept Donor-Acceptor Basic Concept Chemical Equilibrium Focus of overarching competency expectations: The students can use the competence area Dealing with specialist knowledge: leading to the solution of chemical problems Select definitions, concepts and functional relationships between chemical parameters appropriately and justified (UF2). Arrange and structure chemical facts and findings according to technical criteria (UF3). Competence area acquisition of knowledge: independently identify and analyze chemical problems in different contexts and specify chemical problems (E1). Competence area assessment: distinguishing and specifying professional, economic-political and ethical standards in assessments from scientific-technical issues (B1). Contents: Acids, bases and analytical processes Main focus: Properties and structure of acids and bases Determining the concentration of acids and bases by titration Time required: approx. 11 hours of 60 minutes 32

35 Q1 Basic Course Teaching Project II Context: Acids and Bases in Everyday Products: Strong and Weak Acids and Bases Content: Acids, Bases and Analytical Methods Main Focus: Properties and Structure of Acids and Bases Determining the Concentration of Acids and Bases by Titration Time required: 11 hours a 60 minutes of sequencing Specified content-related aspects Competency expectations of the core curriculum The acidity of the water in aquariums must be checked. pH value determination conductivity The pupils. explain the phenomenon of electrical conductivity in aqueous solutions with the presence of freely mobile ions (E6). Focal points of overarching competence expectations: UF2 selection UF3 systematisation E1 Problems and questions B1 Criteria Basic concepts (focal points): Basic concept of chemical equilibrium Basic concept of donor-acceptor possible teaching aids / materials / methods Information sheet: Water quality in the aquarium Creation of a mind map that is continued in the course of the lesson . Student experiments: measurement of the ph values ​​and conductivity of different types of water aquarium water binding agreements Didactic and methodological notes The fact that a certain ph value range is recommended for aquariums leads to the question of what exactly the ph value says and why different types of water can have different ph values. Planning phase: From 33

36 The degree of acidity can be measured. Autoprotolysis of the water pH value ion product of the water interpret protolysis as equilibrium reactions and describe the equilibrium using the K S value (UF2, UF3). explain autoprotolysis and the ionic product of water (UF1). Tap water rain water pond water still mineral water distilled water z. B. in the teacher lecture: Explanation of the autoprotolysis of water and derivation of the ion product of the water Worksheet or introduced textbook: Exercises on the ion product In the previous lesson, the students know that aqueous salt solutions have pH values ​​in the neutral, acidic and alkaline range can. A worksheet-supported learning program is suitable for deriving the ion product (see note below). Introduction and exercise of calculating with logarithms Exercise: Specifying the concentration of the concentration of oxonium ions in decimal, power and logariths. Notation using a pocket calculator Possible specialization: Researching the analyzes of the drinking water quality of the local 34