What is Antisocial Personality Disorder

Antisocial Personality: Risk Factors for Development

Lecture

Oppositional, dissocial and aggressive behaviors in children and adolescents are very common. Data on self-assessment also show a drastic increase in delinquent behavior in children and adolescents since the mid-1990s, especially in the area of ​​violent crime. While many children and adolescents only show antisocial behavior temporarily, others persist beyond adolescence. In individual cases this can develop into an antisocial personality disorder. Even if, according to DSM-IV and ICD-10, an antisocial personality disorder cannot be diagnosed before the age of 18, antisocial and psychopathic tendencies in children have been found in numerous studies. In particular, children with an “early starter” type tend to develop antisocial personality disorders as adults. The causes are, among other things, genetic dispositions, reduced autonomic responsiveness, hormonal influences, and neuropsychological and neuroanatomical abnormalities. Further risk factors are low socio-economic status, poor parental supervision and a style of upbringing that either sets too many or too few rules for the children and then only inconsistently enforces them. Protective factors include a good relationship with at least one important adult, high IQ, female gender, ability to relate, social competence and increased autonomous responsiveness. ms

Vloet T, Herpertz S, Herpertz-Dahlmann B: Etiology and course of child antisocial behavior - risk factors for the development of an antisocial personality disorder. Source: Journal for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy 2006; 2: 101-15.

Dr. med. Timo D. Vloet, Clinic for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Aachen, Neuenhofer Weg 21, 52074 Aachen, email: [email protected]
Antisocial Personality: Risk Factors for Development

Go to Article

Go to Article

All letters to the editor on the topic

Job offers